Gout: A bowl of cherries?

Did you know that I write a health blog for the Worcester Telegram and Gazette? The latest one was about patients asking me about cherry juice as a gout treatment. Keep in mind these are short, general purpose blog entries for the newspaper site.  Here is a reprint:

Maybe it is because the grocery stores are fully stocked with beautiful cherries this time of year, but several patients in the last few weeks have come in touting the merits of cherries as a gout treatment. Yes, I’d heard this before and no, I didn’t really know why. Some patients eat cherries, some drink the juice and some take special cherry juice extract pills they purchase through a vitamin store. My first reaction to the patient who claimed eating a pound of cherries a day cured his gout was, “wow, you must spend a lot of time in the bathroom!” But I digress . . .

Why cherries? I searched good old google and found mainly advertisements or websites trying to sell juice or extracts. I turned to google scholar and to PubMed, which is an internet database of the US National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health, or a site where you can search for what we call “scholarly articles” or scientific research printed in medical journals. I did find some articles talking more specifically about the chemicals in cherries. Some of them were sports-medicine related and discussed cherry juice for post-workout recovery following intense exercise, like marathons. There is an article loaded with very “science-y” words in a journal called Plant Foods for Human Nutrition called “Improved antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Potential in Mice Consuming Sour Cherry Juice.” I wonder how well the mice liked the cherry juice?? (According to the article the food pellets incorporated the juice). An article in the Journal of Nutrition was titled “Consumption of Bing Sweet Cherries Lowers Circulating Concentrations of Inflammation Markers in Healthy Men and Women.”

I did skim a few more articles and overall it seems there are some anti-inflammatory chemicals in cherries that may have a benefit in inflammatory conditions, like gout. Bottom line? If your gout isn’t that bad and you find eating cherries or drinking juice daily prevents attacks, great! If you feel cherries can prevent a gout attack when you feel one coming on, also great! Remember that cherries and especially juices have calories and sugar. Overdoing it can lead to weight gain or high blood sugars for diabetics. Also, we’re talking tart cherries, bing cherries or dark sweet cherries. Stay away from the bright red ones in the jar! Remember that uncontrolled gout can lead to a chronic and deforming arthritis, so be sure to discuss your condition and what you’re doing for it with your doctor. It is possible your condition may require a prescription gout medication.

Advertisements

One response to “Gout: A bowl of cherries?

  1. I have been devouring cherries ever since I heard that they are exceptionally good for you in fighting ailments. I would certainly recommend a more natural remedy than the prescription drugs which are more readily offered. The problem with modern drugs is that they simply do not work and everyone who takes them is still a sufferer. Ever since I became a victim of the medical profession I have been an avid researcher on medical issues (I no longer trust expert medical advice as so far it has been very harmful!) I have undertaken the research for my own ill health and as much for ailing friends and family. I have come across a new and alternative solution which may be beneficial to both you and your readers. It is a new and less toxic 100% Natural Way to Neutralize the Uric Acid (That Causes Your Gout Pain) It takes Less Than 3 Weeks WITHOUT Any Chemical Drugs Or Devastating Surgeries and promises ”PROVEN – GUARANTEED Results!
    Absolutely no risk. A series of article are available at: http://www.uricacidtreatment.org.
    I would be interested in your feed back.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s